Movie review – Inside Llewyn Davis

Inside Llewyn Davis

In Joel & Ethan Coen’s latest production, they follow the life of a folk singer Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) for a week.

The movie is partly based on the autobiography of folk singer Dave Van Ronk.

Davis is a struggling musician living in Greenwich Village in New York City.  He doesn’t have his own apartment and lives between family and friends.

When leaving the Gorfeins’ apartment their ginger cat escapes.  He catches the cat and can’t get back into the apartment so he takes it to his friend Jean (Carey Mulligan) and asks her to keep it until the Gorfeins arrive home.  Jean tells him that she may be pregnant with his child and that she wants to have an abortion which he must pay for.  In trying to raise the money he agrees to sing with her husband Jim (Justin Timberlake) as part of the “John Glenn Singers” for $200 and no royalties.

The movie continues with Davis making his way to Chicago in a bitterly cold winter and realising that the biggest problem in his life may well be himself.

The movie has been nominated for two Oscars – Best Cinematography and Best Sound Mixing.

Despite a good performance by Oscar Isaac and the occasional comedy, I was totally bored after the first 30 minutes of this movie.

The movie also stars Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake and John Goodman.

Directed by Joel & Ethan Coen

Running time – 105 minutes

 

 

The Big Wedding

The Big Wedding

Don (Robert De Niro) and Ellie (Diane Keaton) were married for 20 years before they got divorced.  They have three children, Layla (Katherine Heigl), Jarod (Topher Grace) and Alejandro (Ben Barnes), an adopted son from Colombia.

Ben and his fiancée, Missy (Amanda Seyfried) are getting married and when Father Monighan (Robin Williams) reminds them that the Catholic Church does not recognise divorce, Ben becomes very worried as he never told his mother, a devout Catholic, that Don and Ellie are divorced.  What makes matters worse is that Don and Bebe (Susan Sarandon) are not married and have been living together for years.

As Ben’s mother, Madonna Soto (Patricia Rae) will be attending the wedding, he asks that Don and Ellie pretend to still be married.  This angers Bebe who moves out.

As the plot unravels, there are a lot more twists and turns for the viewers to enjoy.

I rate this as one of the funniest movies that I’ve watched this year.

Director – Justin Zackham

Also starring Christine Ebersole and David Rasche

Running time – 89 minutes of absolute fun and laughter

Quartet

Quartet

This delightful movie starring Dame Maggie Smith as Jean, Tom Courtenay as Reg, Billy Connolly as Wilf and Pauline Collins as Cissy takes place at Beechman House, a retirement home for retired musicians.

Three members of the famous Rigoletto Quartet, Reg, Wilf and Cissy all reside at the home, which is in financial trouble.  The residents are arranging a concert in order to raise funds to keep it going.  The news soon gets out that another retired musician will be joining them and it is none other than Jean Horton, the missing Soprano from the Quartet and Reg’s ex-wife.  Reg is furious about her arrival as he was never consulted and as they parted on bad terms, would have opposed her living there.

With the Quartet now being reunited, there is great excitement about the possibility of them performing together again, despite a few obstacles that they have to overcome.

The performances by Billy Connolly and Dame Maggie Smith in particular were excellent.

A thoroughly enjoyable and must see movie.

Director – Dustin Hoffman (directorial debut)

Also starring Michael Gambon and Gwyneth Jones

Running time – 98 minutes